Usability evaluation of intradermal adapters (IDA)

Author: Izrail Tsals

Abstract

Intradermal adapter device technology minimizes the complexity of the Mantoux technique, thereby providing predictable, reproducible intradermal (ID) injections and removing the concerns regarding the ease and reliability of Mantoux technique when using conventional needle and syringe. The technology employs a simple device with geometry designed to gently deform the skin surface and the subcutaneous tissue, providing the ideal angle and depth of needle insertion for consistently successful intradermal injections. The results of this development were presented at the First, Second and Third Skin Vaccination Summits in 2011, 2013 and 2015 respectively , and . The current publication addresses the performance of intradermal adapters (IDA) evaluated in three preclinical studies. The evaluations were based on the assessment of bleb formation in a skin model, an accepted indicator of ID injection success. All evaluated devices share the same proprietary dermal interface technology. Devices instituting this design are easy to use, require minimal training, and employ conventionally molded parts and cannula. These studies evaluated IDAs of initial design integral with luer lock needles, IDAs for use with conventional syringes, and intradermal adapters for use with auto disable syringes (ADID adapters). The evaluated ID adapters were intended to consistently place the lancet of the needle at a depth of 0.75 mm from the skin’s surface. This placement depth addresses the variation in the skin thickness at immunization sites for the majority of patients independent of many other variables. Most participants preferred the intradermal adapter method over the traditional Mantoux and identified a need for the adapter at their workplace. Evaluation of IDAs by registered nurses indicated these devices increase success of bleb formation. The use of IDA increased the success of forming blebs by about 30%. Nurses felt the injections were much easier to perform, in particular by novices.

About

Type Journal article
Language English
Country Not Specified
Link http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264410X1630620X
Journal Vaccine
Volume 36
Publisher Elsevier
Year 2016
Disease Delivery Technology , Intradermal , Mantoux technique
Added by Marilyn Kelly
Added on 9 March 2017 15:49:46
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