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M. Carolina Danovaro

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  • Joined 9 years ago
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  • WHO published, on 07 November 2023, a Request for Proposals for the implementation, monitoring and evaluation of previously developed action plans to improve the health of students in four selected cities, as part of the study “Empowering adolescents to lead change using health data”.

    The Request for Proposals is published on the United Nations Global Market website: https://www.ungm.org/Public/Notice/219208  

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  • Dear colleagues,

    We hope you are all doing well. 

    We are pleased to announce the launch of a Special Issue on Immunization Inequalities in the MDPI journal Vaccines (IF: 7.8), to be published on the occasion of World Immunization Week 2024.  As contributors to our earlier Special Issue, we have high hopes that you have kept the analyses going and may have high quality submissions you would consider submitting to this next round!

    We are interested in myriad population groups and country contexts, various dimensions of inequality (as well as compound vulnerabilities), and papers that reflect on the golden jubilee of the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) globally (see Call Summary). Research and review articles are strongly encouraged. The deadline for submissions is 31 January 2024, but papers will receive immediate attention and be published with rapid peer review.

    Vaccines has generously waived a specified number of APCs for this Special Issue. Please see below, more...

    Dear colleagues,

    We hope you are all doing well. 

    We are pleased to announce the launch of a Special Issue on Immunization Inequalities in the MDPI journal Vaccines (IF: 7.8), to be published on the occasion of World Immunization Week 2024.  As contributors to our earlier Special Issue, we have high hopes that you have kept the analyses going and may have high quality submissions you would consider submitting to this next round!

    We are interested in myriad population groups and country contexts, various dimensions of inequality (as well as compound vulnerabilities), and papers that reflect on the golden jubilee of the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) globally (see Call Summary). Research and review articles are strongly encouraged. The deadline for submissions is 31 January 2024, but papers will receive immediate attention and be published with rapid peer review.

    Vaccines has generously waived a specified number of APCs for this Special Issue. Please see below, more information on the call and reach out to us if we can help with the process or answer questions.

    Call Summary

    Inequalities persist in the coverage of immunization globally and across the life course. Evidence has revealed gaps or gradients in childhood and adult immunization within and across countries, and with respect to dimensions of inequality such as sex, gender, socio-economic status, place of residence and more. Yet, our understandings of patterns of inequalities in immunization remain incomplete. The year 2024 marks 50 years of the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI). The EPI has galvanized national and global collaboration and helped set up essential infrastructure and standardized processes to universalize access to immunization. In this Special Issue, we place emphasis on research and review articles that deepen our understanding of immunization inequalities as well as highlight entry points or modalities to reduce them. We encourage submissions that apply rigorous and innovative methodological approaches, including multilevel modeling, compound and/or intersectional vulnerabilities or disadvantages, and geospatial approaches, as well as statistical and computational innovations in understanding and summarizing inequalities in immunization.

    How to submit

    Follow this link to submit your article

    Instructions for authors are available here

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  • M. Carolina Danovaro is now following Dr Daudi Manyanga
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  • Dear all

     

    The report “Investigating the use of digital solutions in the COVID-19 pandemic: an exploratory analysis of eIR and eLMIS in Guinea, Honduras, India, Rwanda and Tanzania” – commissioned by the Gates Foundation and done by Bocconi University and MMGH – is now available in French and Spanish. I attach the original plus the translations; feel free to share. 

    The executive summary is pasted here:

    This report presents a series of brief case studies supported by the existing literature on the deployment of digital solutions during the COVID-19 pandemic. It specifically describes how electronic Immunization Registries (eIR) and electronic Logistics Management Information Systems (eLMIS) have been newly developed and/or repurposed in Guinea, Honduras, India, Rwanda, and Tanzania. Importantly, the findings are influenced by the state of the implementation which, because of the delayed availability of COVID-19 vaccines in the LMICs, is still in its early phase. 

    Overall, Tanza...

    Dear all

     

    The report “Investigating the use of digital solutions in the COVID-19 pandemic: an exploratory analysis of eIR and eLMIS in Guinea, Honduras, India, Rwanda and Tanzania” – commissioned by the Gates Foundation and done by Bocconi University and MMGH – is now available in French and Spanish. I attach the original plus the translations; feel free to share. 

    The executive summary is pasted here:

    This report presents a series of brief case studies supported by the existing literature on the deployment of digital solutions during the COVID-19 pandemic. It specifically describes how electronic Immunization Registries (eIR) and electronic Logistics Management Information Systems (eLMIS) have been newly developed and/or repurposed in Guinea, Honduras, India, Rwanda, and Tanzania. Importantly, the findings are influenced by the state of the implementation which, because of the delayed availability of COVID-19 vaccines in the LMICs, is still in its early phase. 

    Overall, Tanzania and India relied on their existing eLMIS solutions to roll-out the COVID-19 vaccines, however, resorted to the de novo development of complementary eIR solutions for tracking of beneficiaries. The latter are to be integrated in the future with the digital infrastructure and systems that currently support routine immunization efforts in these countries, including Civil Registry and Vital Statistics (CRVS) systems. Conversely, Rwanda implemented a separate COVID-19 EIR Tracker as an additional module to its District Health Information Software (DHIS2) platform which also hosts the eIR for routine immunization. Finally, Honduras and Guinea attempted to use the existing eIR and eLMIS systems, respectively, but succeeded only partially in adapting them and did not ensure deployment of all the required functionality across the country, resulting in the need for implementation of multiple parallel solutions. 

    Several key lessons have emerged from the countries analysed, with support from the literature. The findings in this report clearly highlight the value of simplicity and flexibility in the design of the digital solutions, as well as the need to support local capacity to develop and adapt the tools to the specific context. The roll-out of many concurrent systems to fill gaps in the existing implemented solutions should be avoided as a source of unnecessary complexity. Building local competencies – that is, not continuing to reply upon expensive and time-bound external resources – also emerged as a clear success factor necessary to ensure real ownership and sustainability, as well as the need to strengthen the workforce with extended training and involvement of community health workers in the data collection process to reach zero-dose children. Finally, the need for a strong political commitment and a clear vision for the use of these digital solutions is essential to secure the domestic financing required for sustainable investments. 

    This report serves as a call to “keep it simple and keep it local.” Development partners should invest in existing systems and human resources avoiding duplications and ensuring consistency and streamlined processes, wherever possible. Critical observations about the further roll-out of digital solutions over the next six months of the pandemic, coupled with the completion of the broader evaluation on the impact of these solutions, will provide additional information to guide the emerging learning agenda in this area which can further inform future investment decisions on the sustainable scale-up of eIRs and eLMIS as part of integrated health management information systems.

    Carolina

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  •   SANDEEP RATHOD reacted to this post about 1 year ago

    Dear TechNet-21 Members,

    The annual WHO and UNICEF national estimates of immunization coverage (WUENIC) 2022 here were officially released on15th July.

    You can access all data here: https://immunizationdata.who.int/ and https://data.unicef.org/topic/child-health/immunization/

    Key WUENIC data findings and implications

    • 25 million children missed out on basic vaccines through routine immunization service in 2021, 6 million more than before the start of the pandemic in 2019.
    • This is the highest number since 2006 and is the result of the Covid-19 pandemic, associated disruptions, and Covid-19 vaccination efforts, which have strained health systems in 2020 and 2021.  
    • 18 million children missed out on any vaccination in 2021, a number not seen since 2008. Almost all zero-dose children – those never vaccinated with even a first dose of DTP-containing vaccine live in low- and middle-income countries, especially in the African and South-East Asian regions.  
    • The South-East...

    Dear TechNet-21 Members,

    The annual WHO and UNICEF national estimates of immunization coverage (WUENIC) 2022 here were officially released on15th July.

    You can access all data here: https://immunizationdata.who.int/ and https://data.unicef.org/topic/child-health/immunization/

    Key WUENIC data findings and implications

    • 25 million children missed out on basic vaccines through routine immunization service in 2021, 6 million more than before the start of the pandemic in 2019.
    • This is the highest number since 2006 and is the result of the Covid-19 pandemic, associated disruptions, and Covid-19 vaccination efforts, which have strained health systems in 2020 and 2021.  
    • 18 million children missed out on any vaccination in 2021, a number not seen since 2008. Almost all zero-dose children – those never vaccinated with even a first dose of DTP-containing vaccine live in low- and middle-income countries, especially in the African and South-East Asian regions.  
    • The South-East Asian Region was most affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and related disruptions with drop of 9 percentage points over two years Western Pacific regions, Region of the Americas, and the African Region all experienced 4 percentage points over two years 
    • The Eastern Mediterranean Region experienced 3 percentage points reductions. The European Region limited the impact to 1 percentage point.  Significant efforts will be needed to recover from pandemic strains and to sustain immunization as an essential health service. 
    • 26 vaccine introductions were reported in 2021, up from 17 in 2020, but well below the long-run average of around 50 per year in previous decades. However, 192 member states introduced Covid-19 vaccines in 2020 and 2021. 
    • In 2021, the average coverage for vaccines targeting 11 diseases stood at 68% compared with 8% in 1980.
    • Coverage of a first dose of a vaccine protecting against measles (MCV-1) dropped to 81% in 2021, the lowest level since 2008. This leaves 7 million children vulnerable. ​A further 14.7 million children received only a first dose, but not a needed second dose through regular public health services. 
    • Global coverage of first dose of HPV dropped to 15% in 2021 while second dose coverage remained at 12%.  Compared to 2019 this represents an unprecedented 25% reduction in first dose coverage and a 15% reduction in second dose. 

    Lots to do. Catch-up guidance here: https://www.who.int/publications/i/item/9789240016514 and SAGE recommendations here: 

    English: https://www.technet-21.org/en/library/main/7945-guiding-principles-for-recovering,-building-resiliency,-and-strengthening-of-immunization-in-2022-and-beyond

    French: https://www.technet-21.org/en/library/main/7946-principes-directeurs-de-la-reprise,-de-la-promotion-de-la-r%C3%A9silience-et-du-renforcement-de-la-vaccination-en-2022-et-au-del%C3%A0

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  •   SANDEEP RATHOD reacted to this post about 1 year ago

    A Special Issue on Immunization Inequalities in the MDPI journal Vaccines will be published on the occasion of World Immunization Week 2023. We are interested in myriad population groups and country contexts, various dimensions of inequality (as well as compound vulnerabilities), and immunization access through various stages of the life course (see Summary). Research articles, as well as other paper formats, especially those describing equity-oriented programming are also welcome. The deadline for submissions is February 2023, but papers will receive immediate attention and be published with rapid peer review.

    Vaccines has generously waived APCs for this Special Issue. Please see attached and below more information on the call and reach out to us if we can help with the process or answer questions.

     

    Call Summary

    While overall in the world, immunization rates stagnated prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, and declined in 2020 and 2021, this is neither uniformly the case for...

    A Special Issue on Immunization Inequalities in the MDPI journal Vaccines will be published on the occasion of World Immunization Week 2023. We are interested in myriad population groups and country contexts, various dimensions of inequality (as well as compound vulnerabilities), and immunization access through various stages of the life course (see Summary). Research articles, as well as other paper formats, especially those describing equity-oriented programming are also welcome. The deadline for submissions is February 2023, but papers will receive immediate attention and be published with rapid peer review.

    Vaccines has generously waived APCs for this Special Issue. Please see attached and below more information on the call and reach out to us if we can help with the process or answer questions.

     

    Call Summary

    While overall in the world, immunization rates stagnated prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, and declined in 2020 and 2021, this is neither uniformly the case for all types of vaccines, nor for all population sub-groups for any individual vaccine. Furthermore, the breadth of protection varies, with many countries lagging behind in the introduction of new and under-utilized vaccines, such as those against the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) and seasonal influenza, to name a few. In this Special Issue, we will explore the latest evidence on various types of immunization across the life course at global, regional, national and subnational levels. We encourage submissions that explore various dimensions of inequality—such as economic status, subnational geographic regions, sex, maternal education—and other categories (like migrant status or occupation), or that shed greater analytical or methodological light on priority population subgroups, namely, populations facing gender barriers, rural residents, the urban poor, and populations living in conflict areas. We encourage submissions that compare various country contexts or that assess trends over time, and those that draw from geographies where the evidence has been limited to date, such as Low and Middle-Income Country contexts. Communications that describe the impacts of inequality monitoring of immunization are also welcome.

     

    How to submit

    Follow this link to submit your article

    Instructions for authors are available here

     

    Do please spread the word and consider submitting!

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  • You are invited to the launching of the manual Designing and Implementing Gridded Population Surveys, a manual with step-by-step tutorials for survey practitioners - See flyer to register or go here https://teams.microsoft.com/registration/2zWeD09UYE-9zF6kFubccA,Br5CidzRyEyk5fawxT_jcw,gtfS8ogAJkiW33HrpW5tLg,S996bwQlqEui3_IC03159w,Gdv_GJhmAUqhpNvVKCvTsg,rxtSWx5rl0WdkOHbu29xRg?mode=read&tenantId=0f9e35db-544f-4f60-bdcc-5ea416e6dc70&skipauthstrap=1

    The session will provide guidance about the datasets and tools used in gridded population surveys, and reviews three real-world comparisons between traditional census surveys and gridded population surveys in Uruguay, Nigeria, and Nepal. Survey statisticians in government, the private sector, academia, and the non-profit sector should find this session informative whether or not they plan to use gridded population sampling.

    Speakers

     
    Dana R ThomsonThe emphasis of Dr. Thomson research is identification of populations who are...

    You are invited to the launching of the manual Designing and Implementing Gridded Population Surveys, a manual with step-by-step tutorials for survey practitioners - See flyer to register or go here https://teams.microsoft.com/registration/2zWeD09UYE-9zF6kFubccA,Br5CidzRyEyk5fawxT_jcw,gtfS8ogAJkiW33HrpW5tLg,S996bwQlqEui3_IC03159w,Gdv_GJhmAUqhpNvVKCvTsg,rxtSWx5rl0WdkOHbu29xRg?mode=read&tenantId=0f9e35db-544f-4f60-bdcc-5ea416e6dc70&skipauthstrap=1

    The session will provide guidance about the datasets and tools used in gridded population surveys, and reviews three real-world comparisons between traditional census surveys and gridded population surveys in Uruguay, Nigeria, and Nepal. Survey statisticians in government, the private sector, academia, and the non-profit sector should find this session informative whether or not they plan to use gridded population sampling.

    Speakers

     
    Dana R ThomsonThe emphasis of Dr. Thomson research is identification of populations who are under-represented in household surveys and other official data, and development of tools and protocols to improve population data accuracy. Her research is focused on methods to address decay in LMIC survey accuracy due to major social shifts that have modified household configuration and behaviors over the last four decades, including urbanization and increased mobility. Dr. Thomson has helped to pioneer the field of gridded population sampling, and recently published a manual with step-by-step tutorials for Designing and Implementing Gridded Population Surveys.
     
    Sarah Staveteig Ford (tentative)Sarah Staveteig Ford, Ph.D., is a statistician and technical advisor on international survey design and data analytics for the U.S. State Department. She has over twenty years of experience in survey design, mixed-methods research, and statistical analysis, including work experience in twenty countries. Prior to joining the State Department, she was a Senior Researcher at The Demographic and Health Surveys Program with Avenir Health, a Peccei Scholar at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) in Austria, and a Research Associate at the Urban Institute. Sarah earned her Ph.D. in demography and sociology from the University of California, Berkeley.
     
    Micheal ImohiNational Bureau of Statistics, Nigeria. Imohi Michael started worked with the Bureau since 1986. He led various projects in the office, including on the Maternal and Perinatal Child Surveillance Response, Spotlight Initiative Gender Based Violence Analysis, national health accounts in collaboration with the EU-UN Nigeria. Retired in 2021 but continued to work with the Bureau after the retirement.
     
    Dale RhodaFounder, Biostat Global Consulting. Dale has 35 years of professional research experience. He leads the team at Biostat Global Consulting, assisting clients with research design, analyzing complex datasets and communicating results clearly. He works primarily on household surveys for public health and has recently supported surveys in Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America.
    See you at the event!We sent a confirmation email to [email protected].
     
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